Remember these Toledo restaurants?

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Me, I’m kind of hit and miss. Some I do, some I don’t.

The Eppes Essen, 327 N. Superior St. Eppes Essen, which means “something to eat,” opened in 1939 by Harry Levinson and closed in 1984 by his sons, Manny and Sidney, who took over the business. The Blade’s Seymour Rothman can tell that story better than I can, however.

The building still stands today.

The Eppes Essen, circa 1963, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
The Eppes Essen, circa 1963, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.

Dyer’s Chop House, a real shining light downtown for the longest time. Dyers could trace its beginnings to 1905, and spent 76 years at its 216 N. Superior location until it closed in 1993 after a slow and steady decline. The Blade’s food critic loved it in 1991, but was panning Dyer’s a year later as inconsistent and “like watching the descent into old age of a dear old aunt or uncle.” Dyer’s was always a good birthday dinner request for a kid in 1960s-70s Toledo.

Did you know that until 1972, Dyer’s was strictly men only at lunch? It took a U.S. District Court ruling to overturn that little tradition.

Dyer's Chop house, 1975. We are looking north on Superior from Jefferson. The Wheel restaurant is further down the street. From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Dyer’s Chop house, 1975. We are looking north on Superior from Jefferson. The Wheel restaurant is further down the street. From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.

White Hut and Suzy-Q Donuts, Secor and Sylvania. I ate there. That’s about it. I can only guess it was a hopping place in the ’50s but by the late 1970s it was kind of a ghost town, a relic to an earlier era.

White Hut, circa 1975. From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
White Hut, circa 1975. From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.

McDonald’s, Secor Road, circa 1965. While the block card collection says this is the McDonald’s at 3128 W. Central, I think it’s the one at 3138 Secor Road, though obviously, this one in the picture was demolished ages ago.

The Secor Road McDonald's, circa 1965, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
The Secor Road McDonald’s, circa 1965, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.

“Ted’s” Hamburger Shop, Monroe and Erie. Google Maps tells me the building was still standing as of July, 2014.

A little research revealed the building dates from the late 1930s and was run by John V. Voudouris (whose uncle, Ted, originally opened the restaurant) and his son, Ted, according to John’s 2015 obituary. It closed in 2000 after a vehicle struck the building.

Ted's Hamburger Shop, circa 1970, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Ted’s Hamburger Shop, circa 1970, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Ted's Hamburger Shop, circa 1940, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Ted’s Hamburger Shop, circa 1940, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.

Kewpee Hamburgers. There are still three in Lima, but Toledo had a few of these. This one was at 2248 Monroe Street. It is now a vacant lot.

Kewpee Hamburgers, 1993 (though those cars look kind of older to me). From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Kewpee Hamburgers, 1993 (though those cars look kind of older to me). From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Kewpee Hamburgers,  at 314 N. Erie, 1975. From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.
Kewpee Hamburgers, at 314 N. Erie, 1975. From the Ted J. Ligibel collection, courtesy of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, obtained from http://images2.toledolibrary.org/.

Places I wish I could find a picture of:

Frank Unkle’s. Apparently the Toledo Zoo recently bought the former site of that restaurant.

Farrell’s at the Franklin Park Mall. They still exist but are in California.

The Blade, July 12, 1971.
The Blade, July 12, 1971.

Dominic’s Italian Restaurant, 2121 South Reynolds Rd., undoubtedly dragged down by the sinking of Southwyck.

From The Blade, May 8, 1982.
From The Blade, May 8, 1982.

Brauer’s (the Colony, right at Central and Monroe) or Siegel’s delicatessens (somewhere in the Kenwood area, if I recall correctly).

The old Dudley’s at 415 S. Reynolds Road that stood from 1955-2000. It is gone now, too, as I understand it, and is now an Indian restaurant!

And finally, the quaint Green Derby at Monroe and Sylvania, which closed in 2000. It was owned by the Kostopulos brothers, according to this obit from 2012. They turned up in The Blade’s coverage of the 1965 Palm Sunday tornadoes:

derby

6 Comments

  1. Patt Church

    Dudley’s originally had a little Hot Dog building near the sledding hill on the north side of Ottawa Park. It was open all summer and when there was snow for sledding. I used to walk or bike there with my dog, Toby. I would get 2 ice creams, of course!

  2. Ohio Mike

    Having lived in downtown Toledo in the mid-late seventies, I can happily say ‘Seen them all!’ Graduated Stautzenberger ’75 and patronized Eppes Essen daily! My only regret is not knowing what a Reuben sandwich was then, I do now, and want to cry every time I remember that. 😉

  3. Frank Lehman

    Did anyone else notice that the picture of Ted’s Hamburgers (Monroe and Erie) also shows the sign across Erie St for the “Scenic Bar,” for so many years Toledo’s most well known gay bar? Is the Scenic Bar still there?

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